Wacky Travel News

Fake Sputnik Capsule – Berlin

Wacky Travel News that’s out of this world – (as is the totally inappropriate commentary that follows.

March 15, 2018 Edition

Mysterious abandoned Boeing 737 is turning into a tourist destination                  By Andrea Romano | Travel + Leisure
With no leads on its origin or the fates of the crew members and passengers, the plane remains just another mysterious attraction by the side of the road.
An abandoned plane is sitting in the middle of a field in Bali, and the mystery on everyone’s minds is how it got there.
The Boeing 737, which sits off the Raya Nusa Dua Selatan highway, five minutes from the beach, is something of a tourist attraction these days, News.com.au reported.
The plane itself has no branding, so it is unclear whether or not it belonged to an airline. Some people speculate that the surrounding shipping containers concealed it from view for a while, according to The Sun. Others have theorized that the plane was meant to be converted into a restaurant, but the owner ran out of money and abandoned it.
Now, it sits behind private gates and is protected by a security guard. Tourists who want to see it must buy tickets and very few actually get to see what’s on board. Some visitors and travel bloggers have tried to get up close to the plane, to no avail.
With no leads on its origin or the fates of the crew members and passengers, the plane remains just another mysterious attraction by the side of the road.

WOEFULTOURIST says, “Conspiracy theorists agree that it isn’t a plane at all, but an alien device cleverly disguised to look like a 737.” 

 

Ancient Roman boxing gloves discovered near Hadrian’s Wall                                    By James Rogers | Fox News 

Archaeologists in the U.K. have unearthed ancient boxing gloves at the Roman fort of Vindolanda, just south of Hadrian’s Wall in Northern England.
The leather gloves, which are not a matching pair, have thrilled archaeologists. One glove even has the impression of the wearer’s knuckles.
Unlike modern boxing gloves, the artifacts have the appearance of a protective guard, according to The Vindolanda Trust. “The larger of the two gloves is cut from a single piece of leather and was folded into a pouch configuration, the extending leather at each side were slotted into one another forming a complete oval shape creating an inner hole into which a hand could still easily be inserted,” it explained, in a statement. “The glove was packed with natural material acting as a shock absorber.”
The larger glove is extremely worn on the contact edge, and has also been repaired – a circular patch covers a tear. The slightly smaller glove was uncovered in near perfect condition, according to The Vindolanda Trust. It was constructed in the same way as the larger glove but has been filled with a tight coil of hard twisted leather.
Archaeologists think that the gloves were used by Roman legionaries for sparring. Known as caestu in Latin, the gloves are likely a practice version of the gloves used in professional ancient boxing, which employed a metal insert. Wear and tear on the larger glove may have rendered it unfit for use, although experts think that it many have been kept alongside the ‘newer’ model because the owner was so attached to it. 
“I have seen representations of Roman boxing gloves depicted on bronze statues, paintings and sculptures but to have the privilege of finding two real leather examples is exceptionally special,” said Dr. Andrew Birley, CEO of The Vindolanda Trust and its director of excavations, in a statement.
The gloves, which were found last summer and revealed on Tuesday, are just the latest in a series of fascinating finds at the ancient site. Last year, a trove of artifacts, including Roman swords, was discovered at Vindolanda. Researchers also found 25 wooden ink documents at the former fort, offering a fascinating glimpse into everyday life in the Roman Empire.
Researchers also discovered 25 wooden ink documents at the former fort, offering a fascinating glimpse into everyday life in the Roman Empire.

WOEFULTOURIST says, “Also scribbled on the wall was the ancient inscription, “Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee.’

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